C5 2012 Keynote Speakers:

Dr. Mark Guzdial, Georgia Institute of Technology


TITLE: Helping Everyone Create with Computing

ABSTRACT:
Computer science education at the post-secondary level worldwide is aimed at the future IT professional, but all knowledge-building professionals need to be able to create with computing. Professionals in IT are a small piece of the audience for computing education – an estimate from Carnegie Mellon University suggests that by 2012 there will be some 13 million end-user programmers in the United States, compared to an estimated 3 million professional software developers. In this talk, I talk about how to address that much greater audience, to make more successful the non-IT professional who uses computer science. Our field has had a goal of teaching everyone on campus about computer science for over 40 years. Recent work in my group provides evidence that end-user programmers want what we have to offer, but we need to develop new kinds of approaches to teaching CS to meet their needs and constraints. I will present methods for teaching computing that have improved success rates for non-computing majors (while still including programming), such as contextualized computing education.

BIO:
Mark Guzdial is a Professor in the School of Interactive Computing in the College of Computing at Georgia Institute of Technology. His research focuses on learning sciences and technology, specifically, computing education research. He has published several books on the use of media as a context for learning computing. He was the original developer of the "Swiki" which was the first wiki designed for educational use. He received a joint Ph.D. degree in Education and Computer Science from the University of Michigan in 1993. He serves on the both ACM's Education Board and the Special Interest Group in CS Education (SIGCSE) Board, and is on the editorial boards of the "Journal of the Learning Sciences," "ACM Transactions on Computing Education," and "Communications of the ACM." With his wife and colleague, Barbara Ericson, he received the 2010 ACM Karl V. Karlstrom Outstanding Educator award.

Dr. Judy Kay, University of Sydney


TITLE: C2P3: Creating and Controlling Personalisation and Privacy in Pervasive Digital Ecosystems

ABSTRACT:
We are just beginning to see the emergence of rich personal digital ecosystems. Each of us can already interact with a multitude of digital devices, ranging from the increasingly smart mobile phones and tablets, through portable computers to fixed personal desktop computers and embedded devices on walls, and soon in tabletops. Such digital ecosystems capture and hold large stores of our personal information, some scattered across the devices and some in assorted silos in the clouds that we access via web services. And all of this is playing an increasing role in many important lifelong tasks, such as maintaining health and learning. In this talk, I will share examples of my work to create the interfaces that will enable people to control these rich personal digital ecosystems and their personal information. Examples include exploration of the nature of interaction at embedded devices such as tabletops, appliance computers to help people stay in touch with their nearest and dearest and exploitation of personal information by transforming it into lifelong user models that can provide useful mirrors in support of long term goals.

BIO:
Judy Kay is Professor of Computer Science at the School of Information Technologies at the University of Sydney. She is a principal in the CHAI: Computer Human Adapted Interaction Research Group which conducts both fundamental and applied research in personalisation and pervasive human computer interaction.